Get inspired at HDB’s new gallery

MODEL FLATS: National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan (left) was guest of honour at yesterday's launch of the My Nice Home Gallery, which showcases HDB flat designs, as well as interior-design and home-furnishing ideas  (via AsiaOne)

MODEL FLATS: National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan (left) was guest of honour at yesterday’s launch of the My Nice Home Gallery, which showcases HDB flat designs, as well as interior-design and home-furnishing ideas (via AsiaOne)

By Janice Heng (My Paper, Jan 29, 2015)

SINGAPORE – Flat buyers can get fresh design ideas from the Housing Board’s new show-flats at the My Nice Home Gallery launched yesterday.

Located on the third floor of the HDB Hub in Toa Payoh, the gallery was previously known as the HDB Habitat Forum and had mock-ups of two- to five-room flats on display.
These units have now been renovated with modern, themed interiors, including open-concept kitchens that HDB has introduced as options for new flats.

A studio apartment show-flat has been added, and there is an interactive display allowing visitors to design and furnish their own virtual flat.

Visitors can take photographs of themselves “inside” the flat they have designed in a special photo booth, and then receive the photos via e-mail.

Particularly stylish flat designs were highlighted in HDB’s My Nice Home photo contest last month, with 15 winners announced at yesterday’s launch.

Winning designs included a two-room flat with a white-brick feature wall and a mini counter instead of a dining table, and a minimalist four-roomer with white walls and pale wood.

The My Nice Home Gallery is open to the public from 8am to 5pm, Mondays to Fridays, and from 8am to 1pm on Saturdays.

Source : http://news.asiaone.com/news/singapore/get-inspired-hdbs-new-gallery

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Saying Goodbye to One Home and Hello to Another

Saying Goodbye to One Home and Hello to Another (Houzz.com)

Saying Goodbye to One Home and Hello to Another (Houzz.com)

Honor your past and embrace your future with these ideas for easing the transition during a move.

by Laura Gaskill

Leaving a home, especially one you’ve lived in for many years, can be hard — and so can getting settled into a new house that doesn’t really feel like home yet. Whether you are downsizing or moving into your dream home, these ideas should help ease the transition.

Julie Ranee Photography via houzz.com

Julie Ranee Photography via houzz.com

Saying Goodbye to Your Old Home

Take photos of your old home before you pack your stuff.
Part of what’s hard about leaving a place is knowing you’re also leaving the time you inhabited it. Little ones will be growing bigger in the next home, and everyone will be on to new things. Documenting your old house is just as much about treasuring where you are at this moment in life as it is about those hardwood floors and great light. If you have kids, be sure to include a few photos of them in your old home, doing what they do best: playing, building, drawing on the table, dropping cereal on the floor; you’ll appreciate it later.

Corynne Pless via houzz.com

Corynne Pless via houzz.com

Take pictures of your rooms when they’re not clean and tidy, but just as they are on a normal day. The snapshot of life as you live it is far more meaningful than tidiness. If you want, collect the photos into a small album with a photo of your home and the address on the front. This album has a dual purpose — it’s good for working through emotions you may be feeling about leaving a beloved home, and it acts as a realistic record to look back on when you find yourself waxing nostalgic.

Corynne Pless via houzz.com

Corynne Pless via houzz.com

Leave your mark.
If you’ve ever found an artifact from another time hidden in an attic or under a floorboard, you know how thrilling it can be. Why not leave your own little treasure for some future owner to find? Go classic with a time capsule, write a letter or let your child leave a small treasure box. Or leave your mark in a more literal way by carving your initials into a secret spot, like in an attic or on the ceiling of a closet.

Huettl Landscape Architecture via houzz.com

Huettl Landscape Architecture via houzz.com

Have a “goodbye, house” party.
Invite your closest friends and family to celebrate at your old place one last time. There’s no need to clean up — partying amid the moving boxes is totally acceptable. If you can, have music playing for ambience, and ask friends to bring paper plates and takeout snacks. And if you’ve made friends of some of the neighbors, don’t forget to invite them, too.

Toast your old home.
Raise a glass of champagne or cider, and toast your old house before you go. If one toast doesn’t seem like enough, invite friends and family to share stories about things that happened at this house, and end each story with a hearty “To the house!”

The Room Illuminated via houzz.com

The Room Illuminated via houzz.com

Saying Hello to Your New Home

Freshen up.
Moving into a new house can be an unsettling experience. Nothing looks, feels or even smells the same. Start things out on the right foot by giving the new place a quick refreshing with good-smelling organic cleaning spray in cupboards and on counters and floors. Open the windows on your first day in the new home and light a few candles in the evening.

The Room Illuminated via houzz.com

The Room Illuminated via houzz.com

Treat your new home to a few special goodies.
They don’t need to be much, because after a big move, even the littlest pleasures will be most welcome. Think a bouquet of flowers from the grocery store, a bar of your favorite soap or a stack of fluffy new hand towels.

The Room Illuminated via houzz.com

The Room Illuminated via houzz.com

Host a housewarming party, no gifts required.
It should be about bringing some life and love into your new space, not getting stuff, so feel free to include a friendly “no gifts, please” on the invites (or in the email). Who you invite is totally up to you — some folks enjoy inviting all of the new neighbors, open-house style; some enjoy a more tightly knit celebration with family and a few friends.

Neila Hutt Interior Design via houzz.com

Neila Hutt Interior Design via houzz.com

Put your stamp on the new place.
Paint a wall, hang some art, order curtains — it doesn’t really matter what, just do something that makes your new place feel like you. Investing time and bringing treasures into your new house will help propel you toward feeling at home.

Source : http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/42060230/list/saying-goodbye-to-one-home-and-hello-to-another

Singapore residential property market to remain weak on continued gov’t cooling

News Analysis: Singapore residential property market to remain weak on continued gov't cooling (xinhuanet.com)

News Analysis: Singapore residential property market to remain weak on continued gov’t cooling (xinhuanet.com)

by Tan Shih Ming

SINGAPORE, Jan. 19 (Xinhua) — As latest home sales continued to slow down, analysts here said that Singapore’s residential property market is expected to remain weak this year.

New home sales in December last year were still weak with only 230 units changing hands, which made transaction volumes in 2014 shrinking to half of 2013’s level. The demand continued to be adversely affected by the tighter credit markets and higher transaction costs as a result of ongoing government curbs.

To make matters worse, the benchmark interest rate of the city- state is going up. Singapore inter-bank offered rate (SIBOR) jumped visibly higher this year to date, which is likely to hit everyone’s mortgage bill.

Deutsche Bank Research estimated that for a 1 million Singapore dollar mortgage, every 10 basis point change in SIBOR will increase the monthly payment by about 50 Singapore dollars per month, assuming a loan tenure of 25 years.

Interest rates remain the key macro risk to the residential market, with an unexpected upward shock potentially impacting demand and affordability.

Analysts agreed that the Singapore residential market is unlikely to improve this year. DBS Group Research said with demand for new units remaining tepid due to ongoing government curbs, buying demand will remain weak.

On the supply side, the market also faced unsold inventory on the rise and a deluge of new unit completion this year. Thus, the DBS forecasts a price dip of about 15 percent over this year to next year.

So far, many developers are still reluctant to cut prices and are still in a wait-and-see mode. Rather than make outright price cuts, many developers prefer to offer incentives such as furniture rebates, rental guarantees and stamp duty absorption to buyers on the side. While these make no difference to profit margins, they help to maintain a facade that headline prices are still holding up.

But Nomura Research said that local developers will find themselves increasingly difficult and meaningless to hide behind incentives. As demand volume drops further, banks are more likely to move against developers, especially if more home owners were to default on their mortgages as a result of higher interest rates.

The Japanese research house expected developers to be more proactive in lowering headline prices this year to stimulate higher sales volumes, especially for projects with an average price point of 2 million Singapore dollars per unit and lower.

Despite weak residential market demand, few analysts expect the government to lift any of its existing curbs soon, citing the marginal price declines so far as the main reason. J.P. Morgan Research said “private and public residential prices fell marginally in fourth quarter last year.”

“While the declines were generally steeper than the preceding quarter, the pace remains marginal. As prices have fallen by only 5 percent to 8 percent from their peaks, we do not expect the government to withdraw any of its existing cooling measures in the near term,” J.P. Morgan said.

CIMB Research also said “given the marginal price declines so far, we do not anticipate a loosening of policy measures on credit and transaction costs this year. We expect private home prices to decline by another 10 percent in 2015 and 2016. While the high-end market experienced the greatest price declines in 2014, the completion of more sub-urban units over the next two year is likely to depress property prices in the mass-market segment as well.” (1 U.S. dollar equals to 1.33 Singapore dollars)

Source : http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/indepth/2015-01/19/c_133930631.htm

Top Reasons Your Listing Won’t Sell

Top Reasons Your Listing Won’t Sell (via HouseHunt.com)

Top Reasons Your Listing Won’t Sell (via HouseHunt.com)

Done everything you can for marketing and promotion, and still that listing won’t sell? Here are the facts and stats behind why you can’t move that one particular property…

pic-150119-infograph-whyyoucantsell2

  1. Home is Overpriced – This is the most common reason a property won’t sell. And don’t think about giving yourself that “wiggle room;” 40% of buyers won’t even look at a home priced above market value.
  2. It’s a Buyer’s Market – The fall/winter seasons are stronger seller’s markets, and give you less competition.
  3. Stubborn Seller – You should never give up on your most difficult clients, but cotinue to make it clear what sacrafices the seller may have to make if they want to move the property.
  4. Recently Purchased – This one is particularly interesting. A property purchased or refinanced within the last seven years can be a turn off to many buyers. This affects about 14% of the homes on the market. People want to know the previous owners were invested in their home. Hopping around, especially after refinancing, can rouse suspicion.
  5. Bad Location – There’s not much a real estate agent can do about geography. Just make sure to cite all the geographic handicaps in your listing interview, so there’s no surprises.
  6. Needs Some TLC – Whether it’s some simple renovations or just cleaning and tidying, a little TLC can go a long way. Cleaning and de-cluttering can increase property value by up to $2,000, and is recommended by 98% of agents.
  7. Bad Floorplan – Again, not much an agent can do about this problem. However, great staging can distract people from the problems and show that the layout is still functional. Major additions/renovations are rarely recommended by agents due to poor return on investment. Focus on the more superficial updates that can be made.

Source : http://www.blog.househuntnetwork.com/top-reasons-listing-wont-sell-infographic/

Punggol Waterway Terraces by Group8Asia tie past + future of Singapore

punggol waterway terraces by group8asia tie past + future of singapore (all images courtesy of group8asia)

punggol waterway terraces by group8asia tie past + future of singapore
(all images courtesy of group8asia)

Punggol Waterway Terraces” by group8asia is the awarded project of the second international competition for public housing in the history of singapore. Held by the housing development board (HDB) and, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the country in 2015, the aims of the work are to renew the image of the society and to open the field of exploration of a new generation of affordable residences.

Master Plan (via Design Boom)

Master Plan (via DesignBoom.com)

With this scheme, the firm has become the first foreign architecture practice to design public housing in the southeast asian city-state. The studio proposes to pay tribute to the first generation of the typology in the city in sustainable fashion. to do so, the formal manipulations replicate the rice terraces of asia. The unique 1200 layout of the buildings, as well as the cascading skyline created by the patios of the roofs, serves to accentuate this connection. ‘forward looking and different from their traditional neighbors, those buildings become the vehicle of an utopia, towards a new life in a modern future, perceived in the early 70’s as the new era for modern tropical architecture,’ says group8asia. In addition, the shape and orientation of the complex, as well as the openings and shading features, exploit the natural air movement and sun path to optimize natural ventilation and lighting while minimizing heat absorption.

Master Plan (via DesignBloom.com)

View from the apartments (via DesignBoom.com)

The stepped platforms enable the scale of the residential blocks to adapt to different urban conditions, granting different dimensions from various points of view. from the waterway, they adopt a more pedestrian scale and are perceived as multiple spaces. From Punggol Central, they are high rise towers. Finally, from the void between the wings, it is a building with open courtyards.

View from the environmental deck (via DesignBoom.com)

View from the environmental deck (via DesignBoom.com)

Hexagonal voids, cut into these enclosed zones, strengthen the dialogue between the residences and the canal banks. Themed landscape elements are featured strongly throughout the scheme, reinforcing the concept of living in a verdant urban oasis.

View from the canal (via DesignBoom.com)

View from the canal (via DesignBoom.com)

The modularity of the dwelling units provides vast choices of use and modification in relation with the evolution of the family unit. The individual pieces are also shaped to maximize the key views of the site. all the living spaces take advantage views towards the shorefront, the jungle courtyards, or the palm gardens.

(via DesignBoom.com)

(via DesignBoom.com)

Implicit in the design was the vision of the architecture as an organism, where the waterway terraces may be imagined to become future aggregators of multiple experiences. The studio believes that ‘steeped with such social meanings to encourage interaction, as well as immersions in nature, this offers a scope to explore the enhanced social value for the building and inevitably contribute in return to the environmental pedagogy and social equity of the estate.’

Forfar House, 1956 (via DesignBoom.com)

Forfar House, 1956 (via DesignBoom.com)

original HDB rental blocks at the current site of the pinnacle, photo © duxton (via DesignBoom.com)

original HDB rental blocks at the current site of the pinnacle, photo © duxton (via DesignBoom.com)

Y-shaped point block, toa payoh, 1968 (via DesignBoom.com)

Y-shaped point block, toa payoh, 1968 (via DesignBoom.com)

Source : http://www.designboom.com/architecture/group8asia-punggol-waterway-terraces-singapore-01-18-2015/

For Sale – Tampines & Simei HDB Flats (16 Jan 2015)

For Sale - Tampines & Simei HDB Flats (16 Jan 2015)

For Sale – Tampines & Simei HDB Flats (16 Jan 2015)

DWG GTA United @ Tampines presents the best value HDB flats in Tampines & Simei right now. Check them out.

HDB 3rm
139 Simei St1, 3S, $370K, 64sqm, simple, move-in;
201D Tampines St21, 3NG, $350K, 81sqm, corner, original;
234 Tampines St21, 3A, $370K, 74sqm, move-in condition, walking distance to mrt;
259 Tampines St21, 3A, $370k, 74sqm, renovated, NS facing, windy, minutes to mrt;
403 Tampines St41, 3I, $370K, 69sqm, move-in condition, corner, high floor;
407 Tampines St41, 3I, $375K, 64sqm, simple reno, well-kept;
434 Tampines St43, 3A, $320K, 74sqm, original;
465 Tampines St44, 3A, $370K, 74sqm, high floor, simple reno, near amenities;
845 Tampines St83, 3A, $360K, 74sqm, renovated, high floor;
852 Tampines St83, 3A, $333K, 74sqm, original;
854 Tampines St83, 3A, $360K, 74sqm, unblock, bright, windy, high floor;
878 Tampines Ave8, 3A, $355K, 74sqm, high floor, original, door-to-door, bright, breezy;

HDB 4Rm
136 Simei St1, 4S, $445K, 84sqm, park view, simple reno, mins to mrt;
141 Simei St2, 4A, $520K, 104sqm, next to corner, simple;
341 Tampines St33, 4A, $440k, 106sqm, move-in, spacious, corridor;
347 Tampines St33, 4A, $400K, 105sqm, simple, next to corner;
518A Tampines Ctr7, 4A, $588k, 92sqm, renovated, move-in;
711 Tampines St71, 4A, $458K, 99sqm, semi-corner, NS facing, move-in;
713 Tampines St71, 4A, $440K, 100sqm, original, unblock, windy;
715 Tampines St71, 4A, $450K, 100sqm, renovated;
818 Tampines St81, 4A, $460K, 104sqm, corner, L-shaped hall;
845 Tampines St83, 4A, $448K, 104sqm, corner, L-shaped hall, simple reno;
850 Tampines St82, 4S, $405K, original, corner, vacant;
859 Tampines Ave5, 4A, $520K, 104sqm, well-kept, clean;
869 Tampibes St83, 4A, $450K, 104sqm, vacant, move-in, well-kept
877 Tampines St82, 4A, $460K, 105sqm, renovated, NS facing;
888A Tampines St81, 4A, $450k, 104sqm, simple, high-floor;
936 Tampines Ave5, 4A, $470K, 104sqm, simple;

HDB 5rm
146 Simei St2, 5I, $600K, 122sqm, corner;
216 Tampines St23, 5I, $550K, 122sqm, simple reno, mins to mrt;
257 Tampines St21, 5I, $518K, 121sqm, door-to-door, unblock;
316 Tampines St32, 5A, $520k, 132sqm, 4bedrooms, simple corner;
485A Tampines St45, 5I, $500K, 125sqm, simple;
486A Tampines St45, 5I, $470K, 127sqm, 4bedrooms, simple;
491D Tampines Ave9, 5I, $500K, 123sqm, corner, simple, move-in, 4bedrooms;
498A Tampines St45, 5I, $530K, 126sqm, corner, 4bedrooms;
498J Tampines St45, 5I, $550K, 126sqm, corner, 4bedrooms, renovated;
722 Tampines St72, 5I, $560K, 120sqm, renovated, unblock;
726 Tampines St71, 5I, $540K, 120sqm, high floor, corner, unblocked;

HDB Executive Apt, Maisonette, Jumbo
460 Tampines St42, Jumbo, $988K, 132sqm, high floor, unblock, 4bedroom, reno;
737 Tampines St72, EA, $620K, simple, unblock, point block;
895 Tampines St81, EM, $700K, well-kept;

For more info, please contact:
Noena de Leon
Mobile: +65 8180 4135
Email: noenadeleon@dwg.com.sg
Dennis Wee Realty Pte Ltd
CEA Reg. No.: R018532C

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